Tag Archives: typography

Brief-Writing Tips From Judge Easterbrook

Judge Frank H. Easterbrook of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has given interviews on how to decide what to appeal, common mistakes on appeal, avoiding “counter-punching,” and how to style a persuasive brief. He emphasized three points:  1) cull and frame the issues; 2) write for the generalist judge; and 3) use good typography. Continue reading

Using a Table of Contents Persuasively

In South Carolina (and other jurisdictions), appellate briefs begin with a Table of Contents. The Table’s obvious purpose is to tell the reader where to find the various parts of the brief. In that vein, headings may be used in the Statement of Facts, and repeated in the Table of Contents, to give sign posts through the story or narrative.

Argument headings can do more. They may be used to achieve the greater aim of persuading the reader why you should win. Continue reading

Appellate Briefs – Appearance Matters

This post and the next two cover the appellate brief’s appearance and format. Printers and graphic designers know this better as “typography,” meaning the style, layout, and appearance of the printed word. Well known features include ALL CAPS, bold, italics, and underlines.

Why does this matter? Continue reading